Monday, 15 September 2014

Closure | 15 - 22 September 2014

To facilitate renovation works for a new Resource Gallery that will open in January 2015, the NUS Museum will be closed for a week from 15 – 22 September 2014. We will re-open with our usual operation hours on Tuesday, 23 September 2014. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Our opening hours are:
Tuesdays - Fridays: 10am - 7.30pm
Weekends: 10am - 6pm
Closed on Mondays and Public Holidays.

Do check out our on-going programmes at http://community.nus.edu.sg/cfa/museum/current-events.php

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Exhibition | Archaeology Library: prep-room

[Gallery impression, 'Archaeology Library: prep-room' | NUS Museum, 2014]

CLICK TO VIEW GALLERY IMPRESSIONS

Date: September 2014 - January 2015
Venue: 
NUS Museum 


The prep-room is a space where curatorial and research processes are encountered in its evolving form. This temporary display is set up to explore ideas and themes for the upcoming refresh of the archival square situated within the Lee Kong Chian gallery at the Lobby level. The archival square will host the Archaeology Library, which will bring together finds from many parts of Southeast Asia and China. Collected by Dr John N Miksic since 1977, the items on loan to the Museum will attempt to provide an idea of the vast range of pottery and other materials discovered at archaeological sites from Fort Canning (Singapore) to Changsha (China). 
 
The Archaeology Library is available for research and teaching purposes, and invites visitors to explore the history of Singapore and its connections with the region and beyond.

Tuesday, 9 September 2014

Heritage Community Series | Decorative Art Nouveau Tiles: Luxuriant Flowers and Other Forms

Ceramic tiles in the Family Hall, NUS Baba House
Image courtesy of Tan Keng Khoon

CLICK TO ACCESS E-FLYER

Date: 24 September 2014, Wednesday 
Time: 6.30pm – 8.00pm
Venue: NUS Baba House

Limited to 30 pax. To register, email babahouse@nus.edu.sg
FULLY SUBSCRIBED.

Join us for a talk by Victor Lim, an avid tile collector, to find out more about ceramic tiles, in particular those with Art Nouveau patterns commonly known as "Peranakan" tiles. He will take us on a brief historical journey of the manufacturers and share a few tricks on keeping them in good condition.

Decorative ceramic tiles were used in the latter half of the Victorian era in thousands of houses. They were glazed and incorporated designs predominantly based on floral motifs.

When those tiles gained popularity with the Chinese and Peranakan communities in Southeast Asia, various auspicious Chinese elements were introduced into the decorative designs. These included the dragon, phoenix, qilin, flowers and fruits such as the pomegranate and pineapple. Such tiles can be seen on the external walls of shophouses in areas such as Blair Plain, Emerald Hill, Joo Chiat, Katong and so forth.

About the speaker

Victor Lim is a Peranakan and a tile enthusiast who began collecting in the 1970s. He graduated in 1986 from the Oregon State University with a BA in Science in Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management. Victor worked in the hospitality industry before starting Aster by Kyra, a company that manufactures ceramic tiles three years ago. In his free time, he enjoys salvaging tiles from old buildings and restoring old tiles to their former luster. Victor has an impressive collection of up to 8,000 "Peranakan" tiles to-date.

About the Heritage Community Series
Encouraged by the growing community of Singaporeans actively committed to exploring history and raising cultural awareness, the Heritage Community Series is introduced as a platform where independent researchers, heritage enthusiasts and collectors share their encounters, perspectives and experiences. 

Look out for our upcoming talks in the Heritage Community Series
Friday, 3 October 2014 - Demystifying Chinese Portraits
Wednesday, 15 October 2014 - A Heavenly Offering

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

Heritage Community Series | Emily of Emerald Hill, a Modern Asian Woman?

Margaret Chan as Emily of Emily Hill
Image courtesy of Edmund Low
CLICK TO ACCESS EFLYER

Date: 10 September 2014, Wednesday
Time: 6.30pm – 8.00pm
Venue: NUS Baba House

Limited to 30 pax. To register, email babahouse@nus.edu.sg
TALK IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED. 

Set in the 1950s, Emily of Emerald Hill is a one-woman play chronicling the life of a nonya Emily Gan, and her struggles with patriarchy and the hierarchy among the womenfolk in her in-law’s household.

In her youth, she became aware of the expectations that society had of a woman.  Using her wits, she made herself an indispensable member of the family, and in the process gained influence and dominance over the others. A shadow was cast on these triumphs with her estrangement from her husband and the loss of her son. 

This powerful play revolves around the triumphs and tragedies of a strong willed Peranakan woman who tried to improve her position in life against a backdrop of demands and expectations defined by gender. Is Emily’s life still played out in today’s households?  Join panelists Deborah Tan, Kelly Reedy, Tan Dan Feng and Stella Kon for a lively discussion on Emily as a representation of the 21st century Asian woman.  

Panellists  

Deborah Tan is a Secondary 3 student of Singapore Chinese Girls' School. She is currently the Chairperson of the Girls' Brigade Company in SCGS and is member of several other leadership groups. In 2013, she was the chairperson of the Open Little Eyes Conference, targeted at educating primary school students on world issues, in order to create change, which she is passionate about. She enjoys expressing herself through writing and curling up with a good book.

Artist Kelly Reedy has lived in Southeast Asia for over 15 years. Her work has been influenced by the abstract qualities of Asian folk traditions and the rich symbolism embedded in its mythologies. She has researched the ritual uses of paper across Asia as well as other traditional arts, leading her to incorporate natural dyes, fabric and handmade paper into her mixed media artworks. Kelly has exhibited internationally in Berlin, Paris and Chicago, as well as locally at the Jendela Visual Arts Space, Esplanade, the Singapore Tyler Print Institute, Alliance Française and Sculpture Square.

Tan Dan Feng is the director of Select Books and a linguist and technologist. His public service roles include serving on the National Translation Committee, Television and Radio Advisory Committee Panel of Experts, the Cultural Medallion Award Specialist Panel, amongst others. Dan Feng also chairs the annual Singapore International Translation Symposium. Books that he has edited include Singapore Shifting Boundaries (2011), Indonesia Rising: Islam, Democracy and the Rise of Indonesia as a Major Power (2009) and The Chinese in Indonesia (2008). He is currently working on a translation of a major work on Singapore's intellectual history, focusing on Khoo Seok Wan, Lim Boon Keng and Song Ong Siang.

Playwright Stella Kon grew up in an old mansion in Emerald Hill Road, and is descended from two old Peranakan families. She has been writing about Singapore all her life.  In the 1980's she was a three-times winner of the National Playwriting Competition; one of these plays was Emily of Emerald Hill. Stella now prefers writing musicals to stage plays. She is the Chairperson of arts charity Musical Theatre Live!, which helps create original works of musical theatre. Her most recent work, Emily the Musical, will be seen in Nov 2015.

About the Heritage Community Series
Encouraged by the growing community of Singaporeans actively committed to exploring history and raising cultural awareness, the Heritage Community Series is introduced as a platform where independent researchers, heritage enthusiasts and collectors share their encounters, perspectives and experiences.

Look out for our upcoming talks in the Heritage Community Series
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 - Decorative Art Nouveau Tiles: Luxuriant Flowers and Other Forms
Friday, 3 October 2014 - Demystifying Chinese Portraits
Wednesday, 15 October 2014 - A Heavenly Offering

Thursday, 28 August 2014

Curatorial Roundtable 02 | Dis-positions: Between Artistic Practice and Curatorial Practice


Date: 4 September 2014, Thursday  
Time: 6.30 - 9.00pm
Venue: Imagination Room, Level 5, National Library Building


Free admission with registration.
To register, please email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516 8817.

Moderator:
Anca Rujoiu (Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore)

Speakers:

Michael Lee

Florin Tudor

While the debate on the intersections between the artist and the curator continues, much of such discussions and theorisations continue to move at the expense of discerning the local contexts within which they are articulated. This session is an attempt to add to this ongoing debate concerning artistic practice and curatorial practice; but at the same time it insists also on a plurality within this discussion by examining the different contexts where artistic practice and curatorial practice may meet.

About the Curatorial Roundtable Series
Presented in conjunction with Curating Lab 2014, the Curatorial Roundtable public talk series gathers together curators and artists working across different fields of research and engagement, to discuss the boundaries of curatorial practice. Amidst the increasing attention paid to the role of the curator, this series aims to probe further into the limits of curatorial practice. Although presented primarily for the participants of Curating Lab 2014, the Curatorial Roundtable is an opportunity to bridge the gap between the curator and the audience, providing opportunities for interaction and stimulating discussions on curatorial practices and processes.

For more: curating-lab.blogspot.com 

Thursday, 21 August 2014

Career Opportunity | Curator/Assistant Curator (South & Southeast Asian Collection) - Aug 2014


Responsibilities:
  • Develop, conduct research and catalogue materials/artifacts pertaining to South Asian & South East Asian Collection
  • Undertake publication work and organize public exhibitions/programs to enhance engagement and facilitate access to the collection for both University’s and external community
  • Establish and sustain professional networks, both within and beyond campus with local and international institutions, academia and curators
  • Any other administrative duties, such as committee functions, as assigned by Head Museum and the Centre Director
Requirements:
  • Possess a Degree or Masters in Art History, History, Cultural Studies, Arts Management or equivalent
  • Independent, with skills in research and writing; Prior experience as curator or researcher/archiver will be considered favourably
  • Good organisational and inter-personal skills, and able to multitask and work under pressure

To apply, please click here

Monday, 18 August 2014

Diary of an NUS Museum Intern: Lydia Teng

Note: Diary of an NUS Museum Intern is a series of blog posts written by our interns about their experiences during the course of their internships. Working alongside their mentors, our interns have waded through tons of historical research, assisted in curatorial work, pitched in during exhibition installations and organised outreach events! If you would like to become our next intern, visit our internship page for more information!

For Summer 2014, we have 6 undergraduate interns working with the curatorial and outreach teams, conducting research into the Museum's collections as we prepare for our upcoming Resource Gallery, the new T.K. Sabapathy Collection of books and artworks, the archaeological sherd collection housed in the Sherd Library as well as conceptualising and running Outreach events at the Baba House and the NUS Museum.

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Lydia Teng is currently a third-year student at the History department at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Lydia interned at the Museum's Outreach department where she assisted in the organisation of the Nature as Practice public symposium, research for our Malaya Black and White film screening series and guided overseas groups around the Museum.


The past 11 weeks as an NUS Museum intern has truly been an enriching experience. As an outreach intern, my job scope was diverse yet exciting at the same time. I had the opportunity to develop exhibitionary-related programmes and content for general programmes such as the Malaya Black and White film screening series and was also involved in managing and coordinating Outreach events. It was an eye opener because the internship programme not only provided me with a platform to develop organizational and planning skills, but it also gave me fresh insights on the process of how each event is meticulously planned and carried out. It was a new learning experience where I was exposed to new perspectives and gained understanding of how the Museum plans and runs its various programmes dedicated to reach out to wider communities.


One of the main highlights of my experience as an Outreach intern was the opportunity to be part of the various programs planned by the Museum. One memorable experience I had was to bring different groups of audiences into the Museum for a short guided tour. It was exciting to be able to share what I knew about the Museum with people coming from different backgrounds.  We had primary school student coming in from local schools and even college students coming in from Australia! It is heartening to see how students regardless of their age and background have so much interest to find out more about the various collections there are in the Museum.


Apart from the various tours happening in the Museum, I also had the opportunity to be involved in workshops conducted by the Museum.  One that I thoroughly enjoyed as a facilitator (and also a participant, hooray!) was the Creative Linocut Printing workshop conducted by Joseph Chiang from Monster Gallery as part of the Children’s Season Programme. It was a memorable experience because I had the chance to be exposed to the art of Linocut and understand the intricate details and effort an artist have to dedicate themselves with before the final art piece is conceived. It was also enjoyable to be able to interact with young children and their parents as they fumbled and worked together to create their very own art pieces. 


Along with the other interns, I was also involved in the opening of the exhibition entitled “When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks….” presented by The Migrant Ecologies Project. It was truly an eye-opening experience where we got a first hand experience actually see what happens before an exhibition opens. All of us were roped in to help with the display of materials just before opening night! Albeit the small fluster we went through with putting up the materials in the beginning, it was still a valuable experience to be part of the planning and discussion process in putting the exhibition up in one way or another.



Last but not least, I also had the opportunity to develop and conduct my own research for the Malaya Black and White film screening series. As the name suggests, the Malaya Black and White films is a series of film screenings designed to present another aspect of colonial Malaya in the form of moving images. For this research, I was tasked to find films that were shot in Malaya or depicted it. I am extremely grateful for my supervisor Trina, who was very supportive and encouraging in giving me ample space to develop my own inputs and creativity into research but also provided me with numerous constructive comments along the way. Although the list of films were exhaustive, the different comments given by my supervisor allowed me to understand the myriad ways of how Colonial Malaya was portrayed and understood through the lenses of different American and local indigenous film makers.

All in all, my journey with NUS Museum was a fulfilling one in terms of the vast exposure the internship opportunity has provided me with.  And of course, internship wasn’t just all work and no play! We had the opportunity to attend a conservation workshop to learn about conservation techniques, went on a full-guided tour at the Baba House located at Neil Road, and also participated in a walking tour around Chinatown to find sites of the first photography studios that was opened in Singapore during the early days.

I am extremely thankful for my two supervisors, Michelle and Trina for both their guidance throughout the course of my internship. For providing me with ample advises and giving support whenever I had queries on any task I was working on. Of course, this internship would not have been enjoyable without my fellow interns and the kind and friendly staff at the Museum! Special thanks to Rie, Elysia, Junni, Timo, Weichang, Flora and JJ for being part of this enriching experience I had with NUS Museum.  

Monday, 11 August 2014

Diary of an NUS Museum Intern: Ngauw Wei Chang

Note: Diary of an NUS Museum Intern is a series of blog posts written by our interns about their experiences during the course of their internships. Working alongside their mentors, our interns have waded through tons of historical research, assisted in curatorial work, pitched in during exhibition installations and organised outreach events! If you would like to become our next intern, visit our internship page for more information!

For Summer 2014, we have 6 undergraduate interns working with the curatorial and outreach teams, conducting research into the Museum's collections as we prepare for our upcoming Resource Gallery, the new T.K. Sabapathy Collection of books and artworks, the archaeological sherd collection housed in the Sherd Library as well as conceptualising and running Outreach events at the Baba House and the NUS Museum.

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Ngauw Wei Chang is a fourth year History major at the National University of Singapore. Wei Chang joined us as the Baba House Outreach Intern for the summer and has in the process also become a trained docent! 


I was the Baba House Outreach Intern for 12 weeks and this internship has really been a wonderful experience for me. The past 12 weeks has been a fruitful and eventful as I was exposed to a variety of responsibilities, some of which are beyond what I had expected when I first applied for this position.


My responsibilities include researching on Peranakan culture and the history of Baba House. Once I had completed my research, I started guiding Baba House Heritage Tours. These are things that I knew I had signed up for. On top of research and guiding tours, I was lucky enough to be a part of many other events that took place when I was a part of NUS Museum. I had the chance to take part in the different Walking Tours organized by the Museum Outreach team (Railway Corridor, Picturing Colonial Singapore and Chinese Clan Houses), as well as the programmes planned for Children’s Season 2014 (Family Fun with Clay and Creative Linocut Printing).


Being given the chance to participate in all these activities helped me realize just how much time and effort is required when it comes to pre-event preparatory work. It takes a docent many weeks of careful research, going through a plethora of sources before he/she is ready to guide the Heritage Tour. Even after research has been completed, every tour that a docent guides is a learning experience, be it in terms of time management (it is never easy to limit the tour to an hour when there are so many interesting things about the house to explain!) or how best to make the tour flow fluently and naturally. Furthermore, for events such as the Walking Tours, not only do we have to liaise with our tour guides (usually academics), we (or rather, Poonam, my internship supervisor) had to go through a test-run prior to the event. The pre-event dry run ensures that the tour is not too long, and allows us to find the best locations to stop and explain different points of interest without blocking the paths of other commuters. Seeing my supervisor go through the preparation process really shows how much effort she has invested in for our activities and these are just some of the work that we had to do behind the scenes, and are usually overlooked by others.

Apart from the conceptualization of activities, it is also a challenge to ensure that we are logistically prepared for our events and activities. For instance, Poonam, had to wreck her brain over what paint to use in order to best capture the intended effect of capturing the texture of wooden blocs imprinted for our block printing activity. We also had to start packing the material needed for the Istana Art Event 2014 up to 2 weeks in advance.


Being a part of the NUS Museum for the last three months was extremely enjoyable for me and I’m really grateful for the patience and guidance that my immediate supervisors have showered me. In particular, I’m glad that Su Ling, the Head of Baba House and curator of NUS Museum gave me the opportunity to handle textiles (Nyonya embroidery) that were more than a hundred years old. Also, I’m thankful for all the help and advice that Poonam and Fadhly had provided the past 12 weeks, for giving me the room to make mistakes and to learn from them. Also, having great fellow interns (and lunchtime buddies) made sure that work was always fun and interesting.


Monday, 4 August 2014

Diary of an NUS Museum Intern: Elysia Teh

Note: Diary of an NUS Museum Intern is a series of blog posts written by our interns about their experiences during the course of their internships. Working alongside their mentors, our interns have waded through tons of historical research, assisted in curatorial work, pitched in during exhibition installations and organised outreach events! If you would like to become our next intern, visit our internship page for more information!

For Summer 2014, we have 6 undergraduate interns working with the curatorial and outreach teams, conducting research into the Museum's collections as we prepare for our upcoming Resource Gallery, the new T.K. Sabapathy Collection of books and artworks, the archaeological sherd collection housed in the Sherd Library as well as conceptualising and running Outreach events at the Baba House and the NUS Museum.

-


Elysia Teh is a third year History major and part of the University Scholars Programme (USP), pursuing a joint degree with the National University of Singapore and Australian National University. Elysia joined the Curatorial department and was asked to focus on research for the T.K. Sabapathy Collection of Books and Artworks. 



Things that may or may not happen”

When I applied for the T.K. Sabapathy Curatorial Internship, I had a very limited idea of what curators do and, consequently, I knew I had much to learn. The description of the advertised position stipulated that I would be “work[ing] extensively through the collection donated by T.K. Sabapathy, … build[ing] towards a productive reorganisation of the materials, and engage with the potentials and implications of curating as an alternative or parallel form of (re)writing art history”. Beyond this, however, I had no particular expectations of what the three months would entail. My image of curatorship began and ended with that one scene from Ocean’s Eleven (the remake), where Julia Roberts wordlessly appraises a painting in the Bellagio’s art gallery wearing a fabulously high-collared, brocade suit. The whole thing lasts about ten seconds.


What I ended up doing for three months was vastly different. While the ongoing project of reconceptualising the T.K. Sabapathy collection remained constantly in my peripheral (metaphorical) line of sight, I was also lucky enough to be involved in the installation of two separate exhibitions, attend various workshops and symposiums, and assist in the annual Istana Art Event. I sometimes spent my days behind a desk running up a steep learning curve where curatorial theory and practice was concerned, while other times I inhabited half-built exhibition spaces, interacting with curators, artists, wardens, deliverymen and visitors. 


My internship began with working on When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks, the latest installation in a series by the Migrant Ecologies Project that traces ‘Stories of Wood’. Immediately, I got the chance to be involved in the installation of an art exhibition at any and every level. This ranged from working with newspaper clippings in order to collate a documentary archive, to proofreading and editing exhibition essays, to examining wall text (both in terms of phrasing and positioning) and considering the gallery’s space. Following this, I also got a chance to participate in Safe Sea by collating a catalogue of maritime books on loan from Captain Frederick Francis. In this way, the internship launched me behind the scenes from the get-go, giving me a view of the research behind two separate exhibitions.


I was also fortunate enough for my internship to coincide with start of CuratingLab 2014’s curatorial intensive. This allowed me to attend some of their events, such as ‘When does an exhibition begin and end?’, a public symposium moderated by Heman Chong, Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna. The provocative symposium prompted me to think about the somewhat intertextual nature of exhibitions. From the examples of In Search of Raffles’ Light and The Disappearance, I saw how the end of one exhibition can lead to the start of another, as well as how historical research and archives can be interwoven with art to create meaning – a particularly resonant lesson for a history major.


The internship program at NUS Museum also offered me opportunities for more structured learning, which I found to be valuable peeks into the facets of a museum that would otherwise have been invisible to a curatorial intern. We attended a Conservation Workshop held by Lawrence Chin of The Conservation Studio, who besides delighting us with UV and infra-red light-related tricks, also emphasised the ethical questions embedded within the practice of conservation itself. We were given a tour of the Baba House on Neil Road, learning about the social history of Peranakan families in 1928 Singapore. Finally, I very much enjoyed the curatorial tours generously led by NUS Museum curators Siang and Su Ling – for the exhibitions Between Here and Nanyang: Marco Hsu’s Brief History of Malayan Art and Inherited and Salvaged: Family Portraits from the Straits Chinese Collection respectively. To hear the thoughts behind the selection and positioning of art directly from the curator allowed me to gain an insight into curatorial perspectives that may differ from that of my supervisor’s – and this spectrum of perspectives is perhaps one of the things I valued most about my time at NUS Museum.


Amidst the intensely busy itinerary offered by NUS Museum’s internship program, I often needed to remind myself of the challenging task actually at hand – to devise a curatorial or conceptual framework within which the T.K. Sabapathy collection can be re-launched in the resource gallery to come. In this, the role of my supervisor Kenneth Tay was invaluable. Kenneth brought both wisdom and possibility to this internship in the readings he pointed me to, the conversations we had regarding curatorship and the advice he shared regarding the modus operandi of NUS Museum. As a university museum, NUS Museum has, in my opinion, a great opportunity to be experimental – to tug on threads that appear interesting or pursue new lines of thought without yet knowing their outcomes. Informed by this mode of thought, I was able to explore various concepts of library in the widest horizon possible, and put some theories that I had previously only read about into practice within a curatorial context. Derrida, Benjamin, Foucault – these oft-cited thinkers do actually play an important role in lending us the ideas and vocabulary with which we can challenge creative boundaries.


Strictly speaking, this internship lasted a mere three months. In both theory and practice, however, I anticipate that I won’t quite be able to let go. The ideas of curatorship and regional art history I have learnt have not only provoked many questions, but have also influenced the way in which I approach those questions. The ongoing projects at NUS Museum continue to draw me to return, to observe and assist wherever I can. Finally, the friendships forged during this time have been wonderful. I thank my fellow interns – Junni, Timothy, Rie, Wei Chang and Lydia – as well as museum staff Flora, for enriching the experience. I also thank the other staff at NUS Museum for their friendly faces and advice, and I especially thank Michelle for her work in making the internship program truly worthwhile, and Kenneth for his words of wisdom and for bringing to my table the many opportunities I’ve had in the last three months. 

Friday, 1 August 2014

Curatorial Roundtable 01 | Lines of Control: Curatorial Con-texts


Date: 7 August 2014, Thursday
Time: 6.30 - 8.30pm
Venue: Visitors' Briefing Room, Level 1, National Library Building


To register, email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516-8817 / 4616.

Moderator:
Kenneth Tay (NUS Museum)

Speakers:

Charles Merewether (School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University)
Charmaine Toh (National Gallery Singapore)
Jennifer Teo & Woon Tien Wei (Post-Museum)
 

Despite the rise of the independent and transnational curator, the role of the curator is inextricably bound up in site - be it the museum, the international biennale, or the small non-profit space. To that end, how do we continue to speak about authorship in curatorial practice given that the latter continues to be influenced, changed and developed alongside the contexts curators find themselves in? As the inaugural session of the Curatorial Roundtable, this session will attempt to explore these questions while addressing also the perhaps problematic over-investment in the figure of the independent and transnational curator.

About the Curatorial Roundtable Series
Presented in conjunction with Curating Lab 2014, the Curatorial Roundtable public talk series gathers together curators and artists working across different fields of research and engagement, to discuss the boundaries of curatorial practice. Amidst the increasing attention paid to the role of the curator, this series aims to probe further into the limits of curatorial practice. Although presented primarily for the participants of Curating Lab 2014, the Curatorial Roundtable is an opportunity to bridge the gap between the curator and the audience, providing opportunities for interaction and stimulating discussions on curatorial practices and processes.


About Curating Lab 2014
Curating Lab 2014 offers final year tertiary students, recent graduates and young curators exposure into contemporary curatorial perspectives and practices. Organised by NUS Museum with support from the National Arts Council, this 8- month programme will see participants embarking on a curatorial-intensive designed as a workshop, an overseas field trip, internship assignments to contemporary art spaces in Singapore, while being guided by the programme’s facilitators and their internship mentors to work towards a final exhibition project. 
For more: curating-lab.blogspot.com

Event Photos


Event video

Curatorial Roundtable 01 | Lines of Control: Curatorial Con-texts from nusmuseum on Vimeo.