Tuesday, 22 July 2014

Presenting Portraiture Series | Caricature Workshop with Caricaturist.sg

Caricature artist Adam Chua.
Photo courtesy of Caricaturist.sg
Dates: 12 & 19 July 2014
Time: 2 – 4.30pm 
Venue: NUS Baba House 
Fee: $68/pax


Limited to 20 participants. Fees include all workshop materials.
Recommended for ages 13 and above.   
To register, email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516-8817 / 4616.


Please make payment by 4 July upon receiving confirmation email. Registration is confirmed only upon payment of workshop fees.

In this two-day workshop, participants will have hands on practice in drawing caricatures- is a portrait that exaggerates or distorts the essence of a person or thing. Caricatures can be insulting or complimentary and are commonly used in editorial cartoons. It is actually quite an ancient art form and some of the earliest examples are found in the works of Leonardo da Vinci. You'll learn the basics of caricature- how to invent humorous characters, capture an expression, draw bodies for personality types and when to simplify or exaggerate. Sign up today and have lots of fun without the pressure of still-life drawing!

About the Artist
Caricaturist.sg was founded more than 20 years ago and has been providing art education services in Singapore ever since. Caricaturist.sg was founded by Adam Chua, a self -taught artist, arts educator and professional caricaturist. He is a member of the Association of Comic Artists of Singapore and the International Society of Caricature Artists. Some of clients include entertainment agencies and corporate organisations such as Allianz, Singtel, Mediacorp and Samsung among others.

Presenting Portraiture Series       
Presenting Portraiture is a series conceived in conjunction with a two-part exhibition featuring portraits of Peranakan Chinese. The first part Dressing the Baba was held at NUS Baba House till 31 July 2013, whilst the current exhibition Inherited and Salvaged: Family Portraits from the Straits Chinese Collection runs till 6 July 2014 at NUS Museum.

Peranakan portraits represent an emerging area of collecting interest and this talk series explores a range of themes, concepts and ideas surrounding the making, collecting and functions of such artworks, including artistic practice and studio processes; pictorial conventions; collecting patterns; and reflections on the social milieu.
 
Event photos

Monday, 21 July 2014

prep-room | Notes from a Concrete Island

In conjunction with Curating Lab 2014, NUS Museum has initiated the latest iteration of prep room | things that may or may not happen. Titled Notes from a Concrete Island, a series of discussions, writings and field trips will take place as part of the participants' internship with the Museum. It will also (in)form the participants' working towards the conceptualisation of CONCRETE ISLAND -- a year long programming scheduled to take place at the Museum next year.

Emerging from sessions working towards the conceptualisation of CONCRETE ISLAND, Notes from a Concrete Island will attempt to document the trajectories of thoughts and cathexes between the curator-mentor and the participants attached to the NUS Museum. Notes from a Concrete Island will take place not only within the physical space of the Museum, but also maintained an online presence in order to gather and/or solicit responses from the 'outside'.    

CONCRETE ISLAND takes as its first point of departure J.G. Ballard's 1974 novel of the same title. In it, Ballard's protagonist - Robert Maitland, a wealthy architect - finds himself suddenly 'ejected' from the highways of London and marooned on a traffic island just beneath the intersections of the highways. Perhaps a similar escape velocity is sought after here, a different 'gravity' and an other island of possibilites. This year-long programming at the NUS Museum attempts to trace the various systems and flows in Singapore's imagination of itself: the undercurrents and unconscious of Singapore as a place; its interior rumblings and indigestions; its futures and other horizons. Projects of this year-long programming include: Tan Pin Pin | A Survey (working title, January 2015), a survey of the filmmaker's practice around the notion of the 'cartographical'; The Library of Pulau Saigon | Debbie Ding (working title, April 2015), an 'archaeological' reading of the histories and found fragments of a much-forgotten island in Singapore; THREE FLATS | Lilian Chee and Looi Wan Pin (August 2015), a research project examining the physical and psychical spaces between architecture and domesticity in Singapore. The programme will also be accompanied by a reader featuring essays and pieces dealing with 'passwords' for CONCRETE ISLAND. 

Selected participants from Curating Lab 2014 include Luca Lum, Raksha Mahtani and Chua Ying Qing. To follow them and other participants from the curatorial programme, click here.
prep-room | Notes from a Concrete Island will be updated and published regularly throughout the participants' involvement with the NUS Museum. Occasionally, traces from these sessions can be found in the physical space titled prep-room at the lobby of the NUS Museum. For directions there, click here. For a prefatory remark on the significance of a space such as prep-room, read here.

The crash had jerked loose a clutter of forgotten items from beneath the seats - a half-empty tube of sun lotion, memento of a holiday he had taken at La Grande Motte with Dr Helen Fairfax, the preprint of a paper she had given at a paediatric seminar, a packet of Catherine's miniature cigars he had hidden when trying to make her give up smoking.
- J.G. Ballard, Concrete Island 
 
 
 

Kenneth Tay


Friday, 11 July 2014

Diary of an NUS Museum Intern: Timothy Lim

Note: Diary of an NUS Museum Intern is a series of blog posts written by our interns about their experiences during the course of their internships. Working alongside their mentors, our interns have waded through tons of historical research, assisted in curatorial work, pitched in during exhibition installations and organised outreach events! If you would like to become our next intern, visit our internship page for more information!

For Summer 2014, we have 6 undergraduate interns working with the curatorial and outreach teams, conducting research into the Museum's collections as we prepare for our upcoming Resource Gallery, the new T.K. Sabapathy Collection of books and artworks, the archaeological sherd collection housed in the Sherd Library as well as conceptualising and running Outreach events at the Baba House and the NUS Museum! 

-

Timothy Lim will be a second-year student at Yale-NUS College. Timothy joined us as a Between Here & Nanyang Curatorial Intern, conducting further research and assembling bibliographic materials for the exhibition.



For the past 8 weeks, I was the Between Here and Nanyang Curatorial Intern at the NUS Museum. During this time, I was exposed to the thought process behind curating as well as glimpses into how the museum is run. I gained a new perspective on what the role curators play when designing exhibits.

As the Between Here and Nanyang Curatorial Intern, I worked with the curators who curated the Between Here and Nanyang: Marco Hsu’s Brief History of Malayan Art exhibition. The exhibition is based on the art historian Marco Hsu’s book A Brief History of Malayan Art, covering everything from the pre-historic peoples that lived here all the way up to the days of merger and formation of Malaysia.  They are currently working on the upcoming refresh of the exhibit. The first thing I realized about curating was the sheer amount or resources it takes to even begin crafting the direction of an exhibition. It might have seemed pretty straightforward: the whole exhibition is about the book; you could just go through it chapter by chapter and display whatever he mentions in the book. However, the exhibition is not about explicating the book, but about opening up the seams of its message and really digging into what is being said, and even what is being left out.

My work was focused around studying the text and looking for nuances or gaps in Marco Hsu’s “brief history”, as well as looking through many contemporary texts of that era from the 1950s to the 1960s.  Marco Hsu and many of the artists and intellectuals that were his contemporaries were deeply involved in Chinese education as well, and as such the majority of the texts I work with are in Chinese. I have also just finished a Malay novel, Salina by A. Samad Said. One of the reasons that I work with vernacular texts is because one of the aims of the Marco Hsu exhibition is to add alternative voices when examining the seams of his work; during the last years of colonization, artists and intellectuals were working within their own ethnic groups and writing in vernacular, and many of the resources that are important to the project were not translated. This project was particularly interesting to me as a Malaysian, since being able to speak both Malay and Chinese helped me to easily move between the vernacular texts, and having grown up in KL, it was helpful in understanding the context of many of the authors.


Of course, being an intern does not just mean sitting in a cubicle at the back of the office all day! Mid-way through my internship, the NUS Museum’s Curating Lab programme went underway and I had the opportunity to sit in on one of their lectures by Latitudes, a curatorial team from Spain, who explained their mode of curating and the different perspectives they take depending on the briefs they are given. I also had the chance to attend a Conservation workshop, and saw the techniques and thoughts that go into conserving museum exhibits. We were also given a curated tour of the exhibitions in the museum and the NUS Baba House, allowing us to fully appreciate the work that our supervisors had put in when curating these exhibitions. I was also roped in to help with the madness of the opening of a new exhibitions, cutting and nailing down materials for the exhibitions as well as the cleaning up before opening night!




I am truly grateful for this opportunity to be able to work alongside my supervisors and fellow interns at the NUS Museum. As a Yale-NUS student, we rarely get a chance to immerse ourselves in NUS itself, so this summer has been a great way to get to know the people who work and study here. The research and readings I have done over the weeks, coupled with conversations with my supervisors and fellow interns have challenged the way I see this region, and how art can play a role in shaping the narratives of a place we all call home.  

Friday, 27 June 2014

Diary of an NUS Museum Intern: Chen Junni

Note: Diary of an NUS Museum Intern is a series of blog posts written by our interns about their experiences during the course of their internships. Working alongside their mentors, our interns have waded through tons of historical research, assisted in curatorial work, pitched in during exhibition installations and organised outreach events! If you would like to become our next intern, visit our internship page for more information!

For Summer 2014, we have 6 undergraduate interns working with the curatorial and outreach teams, conducting research into the Museum's collections as we prepare for our upcoming Resource Gallery, the new T.K. Sabapathy Collection of books and artworks, the archaeological sherd collection housed in the Sherd Library as well as conceptualising and running Outreach events at the Baba House and the NUS Museum! 

-

Chen Junni is going onto her third year of studies at the Faculty of Arts and Social Science's Communications and New Media Department. Junni joined us as a Resource Gallery Curatorial Intern, working in tandem with our curatorial and collections team to prep for the Museum's upcoming Resource Gallery and Library (to open in 2015).

For seven weeks, I was a Resource Gallery Curatorial Intern at the NUS Museum. During these seven weeks, my conceptions about working in a museum and the art of curating (it is very much an art by itself- as much as the art it serves to care for) expanded and became even more sophisticated and nuanced than before.


As a Resource Gallery Curatorial Intern, I worked with curators at the Museum. One of my first realisations was the fact that curating is very much driven by research, and that the research can begin as early as one year ahead of the exhibition opening. The Museum is, by itself, a huge mine of information- countless books and catalogues, pamphlets and binders are scattered throughout the premises, making the Museum a huge database centre by itself. The fact that the up-and-coming Resource Gallery will have a library will prove to be a useful addition to the Museum, consolidating all the materials relevant to the topics explored in the Resource Gallery and throughout the Museum. Much of my work centred around utilising much of the resources that we had - books, online databases, old newspaper clippings carefully gathered by the staff previously. Through researching, I had the chance to explore many of the histories that the NUS Museum discusses in its various galleries. I had the chance to delve deeper into the history of Chinese art and its impressive, high-class beginnings (art in Ancient China was largely the domain of the imperial and elite, until it slowly trickled down to museums and private collections), to explore Indian art and uncover the sophistication behind its design, and most importantly, to uncover the history of art in Singapore itself. One of the best research projects I had was researching the lives of pioneer and second-generation artists in Singapore and their art, and to consider the art that they produced against the backdrop of what was happening in Singapore at that point in time.


Besides research, curatorial methods were also something I explored over the course of the seven weeks in the museum. As the eight-month long Curating Lab was underway during part of my internship, I had the chance to sit in on two Curating Lab lectures, one given by Latitudes, a curatorial team from Spain, and the other by artist-curator-writer Hemen Chong. Listening to the exhibitions they had curated gave me an idea of the different curatorial strategies employed. In conversations with my own supervisor, I became exposed to the broad ideas and theories behind curating. These conversations and lectures proved to further shape my ideas about curating, the relationship between artist and curator, as well as that of the museum as an institution and the curator.

Alongside research, I also had a brush with the craziness that goes on during exhibition installations. The exhibition "When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks..." | Stories of Wood by The Migrant Ecologies Project - opened in mid-June. In the last-minute rush to get everything prepared in time, some of us interns were roped in to help with the display of newspaper and other archive material on the walls. Seeing the curators and artist, Lucy Davis, working hard together to realise their exhibition showed us the immense amount of legwork everyone had to put in when it comes to the physical installation of the exhibition!


All in all, I was very grateful to have been surrounded by interns who worked hard and offered their support and companionship, and also for NUS Museum to have given us so many opportunities to learn many different things. Although I have only covered learning about curating, the truth is that we learnt much more. Events such as the Baba House visit and various curatorial tours gave me a glimpse into the past and art's place in our history, public memory and society. It was truly a meaningful internship. 





Wednesday, 25 June 2014

"When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks..." | Stories of Wood by The Migrant Ecologies Project


"When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks...", Gallery Impressions, NUS Museum, 2014

Exhibition period: 13 June - November 2014
Venue: NX Gallery, NUS Museum

NUS Museum presents an exhibition featuring encounters and exchanges between the arts and sciences, between practice and research, between the inquiring subject and the object inquired. An interdisciplinary project, “When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks...” is a continued inquiry by the Migrant Ecologies Project into the human relationships to trees, forests and forest products in Southeast Asia – explored in terms of materials, metaphors, magic, ecological resources and historical agency. Beginning with an attempt to trace the origins and stories connected to a teak bed found in Singapore, and set against the macro-context of “cutting of wood” (deforestation) today, the project has evolved into an accumulation of the diverse “aborealities” – connections between the peoples, trees and wood – in Southeast Asia.

The exhibition will feature several new woodprint works by artist Lucy Davis alongside works by photographers Shannon Lee Castleman and Kee Ya Ting. Tales from two “Islands after a Timber Boom” form an underlying structure to the exhibition, vacillating between Muna Island, Southeast Sulawesi (where early DNA tests have suggested as the origins of the wood from the teak bed) and Singapore island (where Davis has been researching stories of the local entrepot timber industry in and around the Sungei Kadut Industrial Estate). Fragments of iconic woodblock prints from the NUS Museum’s collection are also reconstructed as animated shadows which weave in and out of the exhibition. A disappearance of forests in the region sees also a similar disappearance of the various stories of wood with their attendant memories and practices. This exhibition is an attempt to re-member and re-animate these tales.

"When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks..." is a curatorial collaboration between NUS Museum and Jason Wee from Grey Projects.

Gallery Impressions


Please click here to access educational materials developed by the Migrant Ecologies Project.


Friday, 20 June 2014

Presenting Portraiture Series: A Survey of Chinese Portrait Painters in Nineteenth Century Singapore and Java


Artist Unknown
Portrait of Couple, Man in Mandarin Robe and Lady in Baju Kurung and Sarong with Stylized Lok Cuan Motif
c.1890, Indonesia (Java)
Oil on Canvas, 58 x 43 cm

Date: 
2 July 2014, Wednesday
Time: 
7.00pm - 9.00pm
Venue: NUS Museum
Fee: 
Free Admission

The work of Chinese portrait painters for their Peranakan clients in the Straits Settlements and the Dutch East Indies is undocumented. A survey of such works from the nineteenth century, and of their obscure creators, some of whom whom were itinerant, add new perspectives about the genesis of modern art in the region, and also raises questions about national art and even Peranakan art.

Please click here to view the eflyer.

About the Speaker:
Peter Lee is an independent art consultant and the Honorary Curator of the NUS Baba House. He is a committee member of The Peranakan Association and in charge of research and information. He oversees the Association's website and quarterly magazine as well as special projects like the publication of A Baba Malay Dictionary by William Gwee Thian Hock. Peter is also the co-author of The Straits Chinese House, published by the National Museum.

Presenting Portraiture Series:
Presenting Portraiture is a talk series conceived in conjunction with a two-part exhibition featuring portraits of Peranakan Chinese. The first part Dressing the Baba was held at NUS Baba House till 31 July 2013, whilst the current exhibition Inherited and Salvaged: Family Portraits from the Straits Chinese Collection runs 6 July 2014 at NUS Museum.

Peranakan portraits represent an emerging area of collecting interest and this series explores a range of themes, concepts and ideas surrounding the making, collecting and functions of such artworks, including artistic practice and studio processes; pictorial conventions; collecting patterns; and reflections of the social milieu.

Event Photos


Event Video
 
Presenting Portraiture Series: A Survey of Chinese Portrait Painters in Nineteenth Century Singapore and Java from nusmuseum on Vimeo.

Thursday, 29 May 2014

Exhibition Opening | "When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks..." | Stories of Wood by The Migrant Ecologies Project

Together Again (Wood:Cut) Part V: EVIDENCE, Lucy Davis
Date: 12 June 2014, Thursday
Time: 7.00pm
Venue: NUS Museum

Free admission with registration. To register, please email museum@nus.edu.sg

Guest-of-Honour: Professor Leo Tan, Director (Special Projects), Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore

Special guest: Professor Alan Chan, Dean, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University

Programme:
6.30pm - Arrival of guests
7.00pm - Arrival of Guest-of-Honour, Prof Leo Tan
7.05pm - Welcome remarks by Ahmad Mashadi, Head, NUS Museum
7.15pm - Opening address by Prof Alan Chan
7.30pm - Speech by Guest-of-Honour, Prof Leo Tan
7.50pm - Curator's tour followed by refreshments

NUS Museum presents an exhibition featuring encounters and exchanges between the arts and sciences, between practice and research, between the inquiring subject and the object inquired. An interdisciplinary project, “When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks” is a continued inquiry by the Migrant Ecologies Project into the human relationships to trees, forests and forest products in Southeast Asia – explored in terms of materials, metaphors, magic, ecological resources and historical agency. Beginning with an attempt to trace the origins and stories connected to a teak bed found in Singapore, and set against the macro-context of “cutting of wood” (deforestation) today, the project has evolved into an accumulation of the diverse “aborealities” – connections between the peoples, trees and wood – in Southeast Asia. 

The exhibition will feature several new woodprint works by artist Lucy Davis alongside works by photographers Shannon Lee Castleman and Kee Ya Ting. Tales from two “Islands after a Timber Boom” form an underlying structure to the exhibition, vacillating between Muna Island, Southeast Sulawesi (where early DNA tests have suggested as the origins of the wood from the teak bed) and Singapore island (where Davis has been researching stories of the local entrepot timber industry in and around the Sungei Kadut Industrial Estate). Fragments of iconic woodblock prints from the NUS Museum’s collection are also reconstructed as animated shadows which weave in and out of the exhibition. A disappearance of forests in the region sees also a similar disappearance of the various stories of wood with their attendant memories and practices. This exhibition is an attempt to re-member and re-animate these tales. "When you get closer to the heart, you may find cracks" is a curatorial collaboration between NUS Museum and Jason Wee from Grey Projects.

Exhibition runs till November 2014.


Works are supported by: Ministry of Education Tier 1 Grant, DoubleHelixx, Singapore International Foundation, Nanyang Technological University (NTU) Art & Heritage Museum, National Arts Council, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU, Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, Lee Foundation, Objectifs Centre for Photography and Film and The Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple.

[Image: Together Again (Wood:Cut) Part V: EVIDENCELucy Davis
Assembled print fragments of a ripped-up log end. Part of what is supposedly the last shipment of teak logs to Singapore from Burma before a 31 March 2014 ban on whole log exports by the Burmese government. The log ends were donated by Allen Oei, an old-time Singapore timber trader and log grader. The letter and number marks were punched into to the timber in Burma. They tell you the grade of the timber and (if you can decode the marks) where in Burma the logs come from. A star apparently means best quality. 125 x 125 cm, woodprint collage on paper, 2014]

Thursday, 22 May 2014

Heritage Walking Tour Series - A Journey Along the Railway Corridor

             Bukit Timah Station. Photo courtesy of Dr. Lai Chee Kian                     
Tanjong Pagar Station

Date:
 1 June 2014, Sunday
Time: 9.00am - 12.30pm
Tour fee: $16 (for NUS students), $25 (for NUS staff and general public) Limited to 20 pax.

To register, email babahouse@nus.edu.sg or call 6227 5731.

*Please make tour fee payment by 28 May 2014 at NUS Museum upon receiving a confirmation email.

*Details on directions and meeting point will be sent after payment is made.


The railway network linking Singapore to West Malaysia was established at the turn of the 20th century and served both economic and social activities in British Malaya. From Johor Bahru, the southern-most station in the peninsula, the line extended into Singapore through Bukit Timah and terminated at Tank Road. Later extensions connected the railway to the wharves in Tanjong Pagar district. In 1932, the Tanjong Pagar station opened and served as the southern termius of rail operator Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad (KTM) till 2011 when operations were relocated to the Woodlands Train Checkpoint.


The tour introduces participants to the two remaining stations along the network -  Tanjong Pagar and Bukit Timah which have been gazetted as a national monument and a conserved building respectively. Time permitting; the bus will make a trip to Blair Road for a bird's eye view of the abandoned railway yard.

Please click
here to view the eflyer.

About the Tour Leader:
Dr. Lai Chee Kien researches on histories of art, architecture, settlements, urbanism and landscapes in Southeast Asia. He is a registered architect, and graduated from the National University of Singapore with an M Arch. by research [1996], and then a PhD in History of Architecture & Urban Design from the University of California, Berkeley [2005]. His publications include A Brief History of Malayan Art (1999), Building Merdeka: Independence Architecture in Kuala Lumpur, 1957-1966 (2007) and Cords to Histories (2013).

Heritage Walking Tour Series:
The Heritage Walking Tour Series presents one with a chance to re-encounter sites and their significance to Singapore's complex urban heritage. Guided by researches and academics, these tours take the participants through the layers of urban change, introducing aspects of history, architecture and society. Whether you are a Singaporean, permanent resident or in town for a day, you will enjoy the experience and often the untold stories behind the streets, back alleys and landmarks of Singapore. 

Tuesday, 20 May 2014

Children's Season 2014 | Workshop: Creative Linocut Printing



Dates: 21 & 28 June  2014, Saturday (Repeat Session)
Time: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
Venue: NUS Museum, ST Lee Atrium

Age Group: 7 years - 12 years
Fee: $68/per pair. Limited to 15 pairs of parent and child per session. (Minimum of 10 pairs to proceed.)

To register, email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516 8817 / 4616.

*Registration is confirmed only upon payment of workshop fees.

Join us for some fun with our Creative Linocut Printing workshops during this holiday season! Did you know that linocut is a type of block print that dates back to the 1860s? You will learn more about the techniques of linocut printmaking such as transferring, carving and printmaking images on linoleum blocks in this hands-on workshop. Each pair of parent and child will get to take home their creative prints at the end of the workshop.


Click here to view the eflyer.

About the Artist:
Joseph Chiang is an artist-printmaker known for his retro-pop-culture-inspired art and prints. He has exhibited his works in the United States, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore. Joseph founded the Monster Gallery, a creative studio specializing in creative printmaking in 2007. Besides creating its own original prints, Monster Gallery has conducted printmaking workshops for both private and public institutions such as First Media Design School, Nanyang Polytechnic, The National Library Board, The Design Society, Sculpture Square and Petit Morpho in Hong Kong.

Children's Season 2014 is jointly presented by National Heritage Board and Museum Roundtable.

Wednesday, 14 May 2014

Children's Season 2014 | Workshop: Family Fun With Clay Art



Dates: 7 & 14 June  2014, Saturday (Repeat Session)
Time: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
Venue: NUS Museum, ST Lee Atrium

Age Group: 7 years - 12 years
Fee: $50/per pair. Limited to 15 pairs of parent and child per session. (Minimum of 9 pairs to proceed.)

To register, email museum@nus.edu.sg or call 6516 8817 / 4616.

*Registration is confirmed only upon payment of workshop fees.

Discover more about the expressive art of sculpture, its history, its form and uses through our Family Fun with Clay Art workshops this June! Working as a team, parent and child will learn crafting techniques to create a clay figure using child-friendly Nylon Clay. You will also learn more about how the late Singaporean artist and Cultural Medallion recipient Ng Eng Teng explored and experimented to create sculptures, maquettes, vessels and ceramic forms. At the end of the session, each team will get to bring home their clay figurine!

Click here to view the eflyer.


About the Artist:
Chew Seow Phuang was mesmerised by the pliable body of clay that he gave up practicing as an interior designer and turned full time ceramicist. He feels that it is the responsibility of an artist to make a statement through their art whether it is about the use of form, texture or colour. Seow Phuang's works have been showcased in several local and international exhibitions such as the Hong Kong's First Lantau Arts Festival in 2004. He is an Associate Member of the Institute of Professional Designer (London), The Craft Potters Association (UK) and a committee member of the Kampong Glam Ceramic Club.

Children's Season 2014 is jointly presented by National Heritage Board and Museum Roundtable.